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A J I   L I M O   C H I L I   P E P P E R
The Aji Limo is a medium-sized heirloom chili pepper from Peru and often used in Peruvian cooking. It is a pepper from the same species as the habañero. It is both sweet and very hot, and rates between 30,000 and 50,000 Scoville heat units. It has a bright, citrusy flavor and pairs well with fish dishes and sauces.
The plant that produces the chili pepper is in the nightshade family, along with tomatoes and eggplants. Chili peppers are spicy due to a chemical called capsaicin, which binds with pain receptors in the mouth whose task is to sense heat. While the heat is felt as a burning sensation, no actual burns occur. The heat felt during consumption is measured in Scoville units. Bell peppers have a 0 SCU rating (no heat) while ghost peppers (Naga Jolokia) have a 1,000,000 SCU rating. Pure capsaicin rates at 15,000,000 to 16,000,000 SCU.
H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S
Chili peppers are nutritious and contain high levels of Vitamin C and beta carotene, which the body synthesizes into Vitamin A. They also contain high levels of Vitamin B6. All of these nutrients fight and prevent cancer, and are beneficial for the skin, hair and eyes. Research on capsaicin has also found it to be useful in lowering cholesterol levels, alleviating pain- especially due to arthritis - and regulating insulin in diabetics.
H I S T O R Y
Chili peppers have been consumed in the Americas since 7500 BC. Christopher Columbus is credited with the chili pepper’s introduction to Europe, as he brought them back after his voyage to the Caribbean. He is also credited with naming them ‘peppers’ after the botanically unrelated Old World Black peppers.
S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G
Select peppers that are firm, with a firm green stem and skin free of blemishes. Scars (striated white lines) are common and can be used to determine a jalapeño pepper’s level of heat- more scars equals hotter peppers. 
Diced peppers can be kept in plastic in the refrigerator for up to a week. Uncut chili peppers can be left in a cool dark counter top space for up to a week. They can also be left out and dried.
P R E P   T I P S
Chili peppers can be added to dishes raw or cooked. By removing the inner membrane of the chili and the seeds, it is possible to remove much of the capsaicin and thus much of the heat of a spicy pepper. Chili peppers can also be dried and ground into spice for use in dishes (such as cayenne or chili powder) or combined with other ingredients and made into sauces or condiments.
Dried chili peppers can be reconstituted by soaking them in hot water for 5-10 minutes or until soft. Use as you would a fresh pepper.

A J I   L I M O   C H I L I   P E P P E R

The Aji Limo is a medium-sized heirloom chili pepper from Peru and often used in Peruvian cooking. It is a pepper from the same species as the habañero. It is both sweet and very hot, and rates between 30,000 and 50,000 Scoville heat units. It has a bright, citrusy flavor and pairs well with fish dishes and sauces.

The plant that produces the chili pepper is in the nightshade family, along with tomatoes and eggplants. Chili peppers are spicy due to a chemical called capsaicin, which binds with pain receptors in the mouth whose task is to sense heat. While the heat is felt as a burning sensation, no actual burns occur. The heat felt during consumption is measured in Scoville units. Bell peppers have a 0 SCU rating (no heat) while ghost peppers (Naga Jolokia) have a 1,000,000 SCU rating. Pure capsaicin rates at 15,000,000 to 16,000,000 SCU.

H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S

Chili peppers are nutritious and contain high levels of Vitamin C and beta carotene, which the body synthesizes into Vitamin A. They also contain high levels of Vitamin B6. All of these nutrients fight and prevent cancer, and are beneficial for the skin, hair and eyes. Research on capsaicin has also found it to be useful in lowering cholesterol levels, alleviating pain- especially due to arthritis - and regulating insulin in diabetics.

H I S T O R Y

Chili peppers have been consumed in the Americas since 7500 BC. Christopher Columbus is credited with the chili pepper’s introduction to Europe, as he brought them back after his voyage to the Caribbean. He is also credited with naming them ‘peppers’ after the botanically unrelated Old World Black peppers.

S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G

Select peppers that are firm, with a firm green stem and skin free of blemishes. Scars (striated white lines) are common and can be used to determine a jalapeño pepper’s level of heat- more scars equals hotter peppers. 

Diced peppers can be kept in plastic in the refrigerator for up to a week. Uncut chili peppers can be left in a cool dark counter top space for up to a week. They can also be left out and dried.

P R E P   T I P S

Chili peppers can be added to dishes raw or cooked. By removing the inner membrane of the chili and the seeds, it is possible to remove much of the capsaicin and thus much of the heat of a spicy pepper. Chili peppers can also be dried and ground into spice for use in dishes (such as cayenne or chili powder) or combined with other ingredients and made into sauces or condiments.

Dried chili peppers can be reconstituted by soaking them in hot water for 5-10 minutes or until soft. Use as you would a fresh pepper.

S E A S C A P E   S T R A W B E R R Y
The Seascape strawberry is a large, sweet, high yielding variety. It has a conical shape.
The typical cultivated strawberry comes from the Americas, and is a hybrid - the result of an accidental cross between a North American and South American berry in the 18th century.
The name ‘strawberry’ is thought to have arisen from the long-term practice of placing straw mulch around the growing fruit, and using straw to pack the ripe berries for travel.
H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S
Strawberries are a good source of Vitamin C, flavonoids and fiber. They are good for controlling cholesterol, anemia and fatigue.
H I S T O R Y
France cultivated the first hybrid garden strawberry in the 1700’s. Before the hybridization, tiny wild strawberries were the type commonly grown and used.
S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G
Select strawberries that are firm with even full color and no white mold or brown spots. Smell can be a good indicator of freshness as ripe berries will be sweetly aromatic while berries past their prime will have a slightly off, dirty scent.
P R E P   T I P S
In addition to being consumed fresh, strawberries can be frozen, made into preserves or dried and used in such things as cereal and baked goods. Strawberries are a popular addition to dairy products, like strawberry flavored ice cream, milkshakes, smoothies and yogurts. 
Cosmetically, dried strawberries can be used for whitening teeth and as an exfoliant for skin.

S E A S C A P E   S T R A W B E R R Y

The Seascape strawberry is a large, sweet, high yielding variety. It has a conical shape.

The typical cultivated strawberry comes from the Americas, and is a hybrid - the result of an accidental cross between a North American and South American berry in the 18th century.

The name ‘strawberry’ is thought to have arisen from the long-term practice of placing straw mulch around the growing fruit, and using straw to pack the ripe berries for travel.

H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S

Strawberries are a good source of Vitamin C, flavonoids and fiber. They are good for controlling cholesterol, anemia and fatigue.

H I S T O R Y

France cultivated the first hybrid garden strawberry in the 1700’s. Before the hybridization, tiny wild strawberries were the type commonly grown and used.

S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G

Select strawberries that are firm with even full color and no white mold or brown spots. Smell can be a good indicator of freshness as ripe berries will be sweetly aromatic while berries past their prime will have a slightly off, dirty scent.

P R E P   T I P S

In addition to being consumed fresh, strawberries can be frozen, made into preserves or dried and used in such things as cereal and baked goods. Strawberries are a popular addition to dairy products, like strawberry flavored ice cream, milkshakes, smoothies and yogurts. 

Cosmetically, dried strawberries can be used for whitening teeth and as an exfoliant for skin.


R E D   R O O K I E   C A B B A G E
The Red Rookie variety of cabbage is favored among growers due to its early maturity and ability to grow large and in consistent shapes.
The leaves of the Red variety of cabbage are dark red to purple, with variances in pigmentation due to the pH value of the soil from which it is grown. On acidic soils, the leaves grow more red while an alkaline soil will grow more yellow. 
Interestingly, the juice of red cabbage can be used as a home-made pH indicator, turning red in acid and blue in basic solutions.
Cabbage is a leafy garden vegetable noted for its health properties as well as its characteristic spicy flavor. The cabbage of today is a descendant of wild cabbage. Wild cabbage originated along the northern and western coasts of the Mediterranean, where it was domesticated thousands of years ago and bred into widely varying forms, including broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kale, kohlrabi, and brussels sprouts, all of which remain the same species today.
H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S
Cabbage has long been used medicinally as its anti-inflammatory compounds have been known to heal ulcers, reduce chest infections and alleviate skin problems. Cabbage has high levels of folate which make it an important food for women of reproductive age. It also can help combat anemia and its enzymes are beneficial for fighting cancers. 
There is evidence that cabbage, when used as a poultice, can alleviate pain in breastfeeding women.
H I S T O R Y
Cabbages keep well and have historically been thought of as a common winter vegetable before refrigeration and long-distance shipping. Processing cabbage into sauerkraut was a common method of food preservation for winter months.
S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G
Select cabbage heads that are firm, compact, and heavy for their size. Avoid heads that are withered or blemished, and avoid cabbages that are sold cut in half as those are likely to have already experienced nutrient loss.
Red Cabbage is a better keeper than its white relatives and does not need to be converted to sauerkraut to last the winter. Store in a dry, cool place or in the fridge.
P R E P   T I P S
To prepare, remove any wilted or discolored leaves and chop the cabbage into quarters. Cut the tough stalk away and then slice or grate, rinsing thoroughly before use. On cooking, red cabbage will normally turn blue. To retain the red color it is necessary to add vinegar or an acidic fruit to the pot. It is often added to soups and stews. 

R E D   R O O K I E   C A B B A G E

The Red Rookie variety of cabbage is favored among growers due to its early maturity and ability to grow large and in consistent shapes.

The leaves of the Red variety of cabbage are dark red to purple, with variances in pigmentation due to the pH value of the soil from which it is grown. On acidic soils, the leaves grow more red while an alkaline soil will grow more yellow. 

Interestingly, the juice of red cabbage can be used as a home-made pH indicator, turning red in acid and blue in basic solutions.

Cabbage is a leafy garden vegetable noted for its health properties as well as its characteristic spicy flavor. The cabbage of today is a descendant of wild cabbage. Wild cabbage originated along the northern and western coasts of the Mediterranean, where it was domesticated thousands of years ago and bred into widely varying forms, including broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kale, kohlrabi, and brussels sprouts, all of which remain the same species today.

H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S

Cabbage has long been used medicinally as its anti-inflammatory compounds have been known to heal ulcers, reduce chest infections and alleviate skin problems. Cabbage has high levels of folate which make it an important food for women of reproductive age. It also can help combat anemia and its enzymes are beneficial for fighting cancers. 

There is evidence that cabbage, when used as a poultice, can alleviate pain in breastfeeding women.

H I S T O R Y

Cabbages keep well and have historically been thought of as a common winter vegetable before refrigeration and long-distance shipping. Processing cabbage into sauerkraut was a common method of food preservation for winter months.

S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G

Select cabbage heads that are firm, compact, and heavy for their size. Avoid heads that are withered or blemished, and avoid cabbages that are sold cut in half as those are likely to have already experienced nutrient loss.

Red Cabbage is a better keeper than its white relatives and does not need to be converted to sauerkraut to last the winter. Store in a dry, cool place or in the fridge.

P R E P   T I P S

To prepare, remove any wilted or discolored leaves and chop the cabbage into quarters. Cut the tough stalk away and then slice or grate, rinsing thoroughly before use. On cooking, red cabbage will normally turn blue. To retain the red color it is necessary to add vinegar or an acidic fruit to the pot. It is often added to soups and stews. 









M I Z U N A   A S I A N   G R E E N S
Mizuna is a delicate mustard green from Japan that is frequently used in salads and stir-frys. Its appearance is similar to dandelion greens but has a mild sweet earthy  rather than bitter flavor. It is also known by the names Potherb Mustard, Japanese Greens, Spider Mustard and California Peppergrass.
H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S
Leafy green vegetables like Mizuna are healthy for the body as they contain many vitamins and minerals such as beta carotene and Vitamin K which provide cancer protection and help regulate body functions. Mizuna also contains a high amount of fiber which assists digestion.
H I S T O R Y
Mizuna has origins in China and has a long history of use in Japanese cuisine.
S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G
Select Mizuna with green, crisp leaves, avoiding any with brown or wilted parts. It will keep for 5 days in a plastic bag in the refrigerator. Wash and dry just before use.
P R E P   T I P S
Mizuna is best eaten raw, but can also be lightly steamed and wilted, and is often used as a garnish for the Japanese soup nabemono.
R E C I P E S
Stir-Fried Bok Choy and Mizuna with Tofu • Pancetta, Mizuna, and Tomato Sandwiches with Green Garlic Aïoli • Spiced Fillet of Beef with Mizuna Salad • Garden Beignets • Farmers Market Salad with Aged Gouda and Roasted Portabellas • Bitter Green Salad with Roasted Pears • Wok Sauteed Mizuna with Minced Chicken • Soba Noodle Salad with Mizuna • Stir-Fried Bok Choy and Mizuna with Tofu • Asian Greens with Ginger Miso Dressing
A D D I T I O N A L   I N F O
Mizuna on Wikipedia

M I Z U N A   A S I A N   G R E E N S

Mizuna is a delicate mustard green from Japan that is frequently used in salads and stir-frys. Its appearance is similar to dandelion greens but has a mild sweet earthy  rather than bitter flavor. It is also known by the names Potherb Mustard, Japanese Greens, Spider Mustard and California Peppergrass.

H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S

Leafy green vegetables like Mizuna are healthy for the body as they contain many vitamins and minerals such as beta carotene and Vitamin K which provide cancer protection and help regulate body functions. Mizuna also contains a high amount of fiber which assists digestion.

H I S T O R Y

Mizuna has origins in China and has a long history of use in Japanese cuisine.

S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G

Select Mizuna with green, crisp leaves, avoiding any with brown or wilted parts. It will keep for 5 days in a plastic bag in the refrigerator. Wash and dry just before use.

P R E P   T I P S

Mizuna is best eaten raw, but can also be lightly steamed and wilted, and is often used as a garnish for the Japanese soup nabemono.

R E C I P E S

Stir-Fried Bok Choy and Mizuna with Tofu • Pancetta, Mizuna, and Tomato Sandwiches with Green Garlic Aïoli • Spiced Fillet of Beef with Mizuna Salad • Garden Beignets • Farmers Market Salad with Aged Gouda and Roasted Portabellas • Bitter Green Salad with Roasted Pears • Wok Sauteed Mizuna with Minced Chicken • Soba Noodle Salad with Mizuna • Stir-Fried Bok Choy and Mizuna with Tofu • Asian Greens with Ginger Miso Dressing

A D D I T I O N A L   I N F O

Mizuna on Wikipedia

K A F F I R   L I M E
The Kaffir variety of lime is native to Indonesia and Malaysia. It has bumpy-textured green skin and musky, distinctively scented flesh. It is commonly used in Southeast Asian cuisines such as Thai. The juice and the rind of this lime is used medicinally by Indonesians and has insecticidal properties. It is also known as the Makrud lime.
The lime is a small member of the citrus fruit family, often associated with lemons and used to flavor desserts and beverages. It is valued for its acidity and unique sour flavor.
H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S
Nutritionally, limes have high levels of Vitamin C and bioflavonoids, which make them a useful food for cancer protection and for defending against colds.
H I S T O R Y
Limes originated in Southeast Asia. They were consumed by British sailors in the 18th century to prevent scurvy - sailors drank lime juice mixed with rum daily.
S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G 
Select Kaffir limes that have a solid green color and are fresh looking. Store limes in the refrigerator.
P R E P   T I P S
Kaffir lime’s leaves can be used in the same manner as bay leaves to flavor soups and curries. The fruit itself can be used like other limes, its juice squeezed to flavor drinks, dressings, soups and desserts.
R E C I P E S
Purslane, Meyer Lemon, and Pear Salad with Kaffir Lime Vinaigrette • Stir-Fried Asparagus and Snake Beans with Chile Jam and Kaffir Lime • Kaffir Lime Mousse with Honeydew Water • Kaffir Lime, Ginger, Star Anise Sorbet • Kaffir Lime Sour with Ginger Cocktail • Kaffir Lime & Pepper Marinated Beef Salad • Tom Kha Gai • Soy-Kaffir Lime Syrup • Kaffir Lime and Lemon Salmon • Panna Cotta with Kaffir Lime Sauce • Kaffir Lime Granita • Coconut Bavarois with Kaffir Lime Fruit Salad
A D D I T I O N A L   I N F O
Kaffir Lime on Wikipedia • Kaffir Lime Leaves on WikiHow • Lime Juice Nutrition Info

K A F F I R   L I M E

The Kaffir variety of lime is native to Indonesia and Malaysia. It has bumpy-textured green skin and musky, distinctively scented flesh. It is commonly used in Southeast Asian cuisines such as Thai. The juice and the rind of this lime is used medicinally by Indonesians and has insecticidal properties. It is also known as the Makrud lime.

The lime is a small member of the citrus fruit family, often associated with lemons and used to flavor desserts and beverages. It is valued for its acidity and unique sour flavor.

H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S

Nutritionally, limes have high levels of Vitamin C and bioflavonoids, which make them a useful food for cancer protection and for defending against colds.

H I S T O R Y

Limes originated in Southeast Asia. They were consumed by British sailors in the 18th century to prevent scurvy - sailors drank lime juice mixed with rum daily.

S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G 

Select Kaffir limes that have a solid green color and are fresh looking. Store limes in the refrigerator.

P R E P   T I P S

Kaffir lime’s leaves can be used in the same manner as bay leaves to flavor soups and curries. The fruit itself can be used like other limes, its juice squeezed to flavor drinks, dressings, soups and desserts.

R E C I P E S

Purslane, Meyer Lemon, and Pear Salad with Kaffir Lime Vinaigrette • Stir-Fried Asparagus and Snake Beans with Chile Jam and Kaffir Lime • Kaffir Lime Mousse with Honeydew Water • Kaffir Lime, Ginger, Star Anise Sorbet • Kaffir Lime Sour with Ginger Cocktail • Kaffir Lime & Pepper Marinated Beef Salad • Tom Kha Gai • Soy-Kaffir Lime Syrup • Kaffir Lime and Lemon Salmon • Panna Cotta with Kaffir Lime Sauce • Kaffir Lime Granita • Coconut Bavarois with Kaffir Lime Fruit Salad

A D D I T I O N A L   I N F O

Kaffir Lime on WikipediaKaffir Lime Leaves on WikiHowLime Juice Nutrition Info

R I O   R E D    G R A P E F R U I T
The Rio Red Grapefruit is a cultivar of the Ruby Red. It has a yellow-orange rind and bright red flesh. The red flesh of this variety is due to the presence of the antioxidant lycopene.
The grapefruit is a citrus fruit and a natural cross of the pomelo and the sweet orange. It was known as shaddock (or shattuck) until the 1800s. Its current name alludes to clusters of the fruit on the tree, which often appear similar to grapes. It has a crisp scent and bittersweet flavor.
H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S
Studies have shown grapefruit helps lower cholesterol and there is evidence that the seeds and flesh have high levels of antioxidants which help protect the body against cancer. Grapefruit also has a mild laxative effect. Grapefruit peel oil is used in aromatherapy and it is historically known for its aromatic scent.
H I S T O R Y
Grapefruit was first documented in 1750 by the Rev. Griffith Hughes describing specimens from Barbados. It was brought to Florida in 1823. 
S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G 
Select grapefruits that are firm yet yielding and heavy for their size. They are best stored on a shaded countertop for a week but can also be refrigerated to last up to two months.
P R E P   T I P S
Best eaten fresh and raw, grapefruits are often sliced in half with segments scooped out using a spoon. Honey is a nice complement to grapefruit’s flavor and can be used to mellow out an overly tart fruit.
R E C I P E S
Grapefruit Sunrise Smoothie • Poppy Seed Grapefruit Torte • Shrimp and Grapefruit Spinach Salad • Red Grapefruit and Fennel Salad • Honey Ruby Red Grapefruitade • Ruby Red Tequila Cocktails • Grapefruit Gazpacho • Vegan Grapefruit Granita Sorbet • Spicy Grapefruit Coleslaw • Grapefruit and Avocado Salad • Broiled Grapefruit
A D D I T I O N A L   I N F O
Grapefruit on Wikipedia • Red Grapefruit Nutrition Info

R I O   R E D    G R A P E F R U I T

The Rio Red Grapefruit is a cultivar of the Ruby Red. It has a yellow-orange rind and bright red flesh. The red flesh of this variety is due to the presence of the antioxidant lycopene.

The grapefruit is a citrus fruit and a natural cross of the pomelo and the sweet orange. It was known as shaddock (or shattuck) until the 1800s. Its current name alludes to clusters of the fruit on the tree, which often appear similar to grapes. It has a crisp scent and bittersweet flavor.

H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S

Studies have shown grapefruit helps lower cholesterol and there is evidence that the seeds and flesh have high levels of antioxidants which help protect the body against cancer. Grapefruit also has a mild laxative effect. Grapefruit peel oil is used in aromatherapy and it is historically known for its aromatic scent.

H I S T O R Y

Grapefruit was first documented in 1750 by the Rev. Griffith Hughes describing specimens from Barbados. It was brought to Florida in 1823. 

S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G 

Select grapefruits that are firm yet yielding and heavy for their size. They are best stored on a shaded countertop for a week but can also be refrigerated to last up to two months.

P R E P   T I P S

Best eaten fresh and raw, grapefruits are often sliced in half with segments scooped out using a spoon. Honey is a nice complement to grapefruit’s flavor and can be used to mellow out an overly tart fruit.

R E C I P E S

Grapefruit Sunrise Smoothie • Poppy Seed Grapefruit Torte • Shrimp and Grapefruit Spinach Salad • Red Grapefruit and Fennel Salad • Honey Ruby Red Grapefruitade • Ruby Red Tequila Cocktails • Grapefruit Gazpacho • Vegan Grapefruit Granita Sorbet • Spicy Grapefruit Coleslaw • Grapefruit and Avocado Salad • Broiled Grapefruit

A D D I T I O N A L   I N F O

Grapefruit on WikipediaRed Grapefruit Nutrition Info









A B A L O N E   M U S H R O O M
The Abalone is a large variety of Oyster mushroom named after its resemblance to the abalone shellfish. It has a dense, meaty texture when cooked. It is also known as the King Oyster mushroom.
The Oyster is a variety of mushroom found on the trunks of dying deciduous trees. There are many sub-varieties available in a wide array of colors including white, yellow, brown, and pink, all of which fade to a creamy gray when cooked. They have a peppery, juicy flavor, slippery texture and faint anise scent.
H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S
Mushrooms are an important source of B Vitamins and proteins. They have immune system strengthening and anti-cancer properties. They are also being researched for their cholesterol-lowering and depression-fighting capabilities. 
H I S T O R Y
Mushrooms have been used by man for both food and medicine for many thousands of years, the first written records coming from China around 3000BC.
S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G
Select Abalone mushrooms that are firm and fresh-looking. Mushrooms are very porous and can get slimy if exposed to water for too long. To clean, gently blot with a damp paper towel. They are best stored in a paper bag in the refrigerator, and if they are fresh, last several days.
P R E P   T I P S
This mushroom is well suited to soups and stews, or can be fried in the same manner as oysters. It should not be sautéed or served raw.
R E C I P E S
Abalone Mushroom Risotto • Roasted Abalone Mushrooms with Crabmeat Salad • Abalone Mushroom in Oyster Sauce • Celery and Mushroom Salad with Shaved Parmigiano • Fried Abalone Mushrooms with Broccoli • Abalone mushrooms in sweet and sour sauce • Stir Fried Abalone Mushrooms With Gingko Nuts And Wolfberries • Pineapple Tofu Recipe with King (Abalone) Mushrooms
A D D I T I O N A L   I N F O
Mushroom on Wikipedia • Oyster Mushroom on InnVista • Oyster Mushroom Nutrition Info

A B A L O N E   M U S H R O O M

The Abalone is a large variety of Oyster mushroom named after its resemblance to the abalone shellfish. It has a dense, meaty texture when cooked. It is also known as the King Oyster mushroom.

The Oyster is a variety of mushroom found on the trunks of dying deciduous trees. There are many sub-varieties available in a wide array of colors including white, yellow, brown, and pink, all of which fade to a creamy gray when cooked. They have a peppery, juicy flavor, slippery texture and faint anise scent.

H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S

Mushrooms are an important source of B Vitamins and proteins. They have immune system strengthening and anti-cancer properties. They are also being researched for their cholesterol-lowering and depression-fighting capabilities. 

H I S T O R Y

Mushrooms have been used by man for both food and medicine for many thousands of years, the first written records coming from China around 3000BC.

S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G

Select Abalone mushrooms that are firm and fresh-looking. Mushrooms are very porous and can get slimy if exposed to water for too long. To clean, gently blot with a damp paper towel. They are best stored in a paper bag in the refrigerator, and if they are fresh, last several days.

P R E P   T I P S

This mushroom is well suited to soups and stews, or can be fried in the same manner as oysters. It should not be sautéed or served raw.

R E C I P E S

Abalone Mushroom Risotto • Roasted Abalone Mushrooms with Crabmeat Salad • Abalone Mushroom in Oyster Sauce • Celery and Mushroom Salad with Shaved Parmigiano • Fried Abalone Mushrooms with Broccoli • Abalone mushrooms in sweet and sour sauce • Stir Fried Abalone Mushrooms With Gingko Nuts And Wolfberries • Pineapple Tofu Recipe with King (Abalone) Mushrooms

A D D I T I O N A L   I N F O

Mushroom on Wikipedia • Oyster Mushroom on InnVista • Oyster Mushroom Nutrition Info









R E D   O N I O N
Red onions are a variety with many sub-varieties. They have red-colored paper surrounding purple-trimmed white flesh. They are generally sweet and mild.
Onions are one of the oldest vegetables known to mankind and have long been used for culinary and medicinal purposes. Depending on the variety, an onion can be sharp, spicy, tangy, pungent, mild or sweet.
As onions are sliced their cells walls are broken, releasing sulphenic acids which produce a gas which famously irritates the eyes. Ways to minimize irritation include chopping the onions under water, rinsing onions with water before chopping, cutting onions using a sharp knife, refrigerating or freezing it before cutting, fanning air away from the eyes or wearing goggles.

H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S
Onions are a very nutritious food and can be used to alleviate a wide variety of ailments. They contain chemical compounds which are believed to have anti-inflammatory, anti-cholesterol, anti-cancer and antioxidant properties and aid in alleviating conditions like the common cold, heart disease, and diabetes. Onions may be especially helpful for women who are at risk for osteoporosis as they have compounds that destroy osteoclasts that break down bone. 
It should be noted that recent evidence indicates that dogs, cats, and other animals should NOT be given onions as they are toxic to their systems.
H I S T O R Y
The first use of onions were traced to the Bronze Age, around 5000 BC. Ancient Egyptians placed onions in the eye sockets of dead pharaohs to encourage reawakening in the afterlife. Ancient Grecian athletes would eat them to thin out their blood. Roman gladiators rubbed themselves with onion to tighten their muscles. In the Middle Ages people used onions to pay for their rent and gave them as gifts. They were introduced to North America by Christopher Columbus on his 1492 expedition. 
S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G
Select onions that are firm, without dark pits or soft spots. Onions can be stored for months in cool dark spaces. 
P R E P   T I P S
Onions are often combined with garlic and oil or butter and used as a base for a sautée. Cooking onion at a low heat for a long period of time caramelizes the vegetable, making it very sweet. They can also be used to flavor roasts, soups, stews, curries, or used raw as a condiment and incorporated into salads and sandwiches.

R E C I P E S
How to Caramelize Onions • Roasted Red Onions with Butter, Honey, and Balsamic Vinegar • Pickled Red Onions • Balsamic-Glazed Red Onions • French Red Onion Soup • Grilled Cornbread Salad with Red Onions, Arugula, and Red Wine Vinaigrette • Three-Bean Salad with Red Onion and Red Bell Pepper • Buffalo Burgers with Pickled Onions and Smoky Red Pepper Sauce • Filets Mignons with Mustard Port Sauce with Red Onion Confit • Red Onion Sauerkraut
A D D I T I O N A L   I N F O
Onions on Wikipedia • Raw Onion Nutrition Info

R E D   O N I O N

Red onions are a variety with many sub-varieties. They have red-colored paper surrounding purple-trimmed white flesh. They are generally sweet and mild.

Onions are one of the oldest vegetables known to mankind and have long been used for culinary and medicinal purposes. Depending on the variety, an onion can be sharp, spicy, tangy, pungent, mild or sweet.

As onions are sliced their cells walls are broken, releasing sulphenic acids which produce a gas which famously irritates the eyes. Ways to minimize irritation include chopping the onions under water, rinsing onions with water before chopping, cutting onions using a sharp knife, refrigerating or freezing it before cutting, fanning air away from the eyes or wearing goggles.

H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S

Onions are a very nutritious food and can be used to alleviate a wide variety of ailments. They contain chemical compounds which are believed to have anti-inflammatory, anti-cholesterol, anti-cancer and antioxidant properties and aid in alleviating conditions like the common cold, heart disease, and diabetes. Onions may be especially helpful for women who are at risk for osteoporosis as they have compounds that destroy osteoclasts that break down bone. 

It should be noted that recent evidence indicates that dogs, cats, and other animals should NOT be given onions as they are toxic to their systems.

H I S T O R Y

The first use of onions were traced to the Bronze Age, around 5000 BC. Ancient Egyptians placed onions in the eye sockets of dead pharaohs to encourage reawakening in the afterlife. Ancient Grecian athletes would eat them to thin out their blood. Roman gladiators rubbed themselves with onion to tighten their muscles. In the Middle Ages people used onions to pay for their rent and gave them as gifts. They were introduced to North America by Christopher Columbus on his 1492 expedition.

S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G

Select onions that are firm, without dark pits or soft spots. Onions can be stored for months in cool dark spaces.

P R E P   T I P S

Onions are often combined with garlic and oil or butter and used as a base for a sautée. Cooking onion at a low heat for a long period of time caramelizes the vegetable, making it very sweet. They can also be used to flavor roasts, soups, stews, curries, or used raw as a condiment and incorporated into salads and sandwiches.

R E C I P E S

How to Caramelize Onions • Roasted Red Onions with Butter, Honey, and Balsamic Vinegar • Pickled Red Onions • Balsamic-Glazed Red Onions • French Red Onion Soup • Grilled Cornbread Salad with Red Onions, Arugula, and Red Wine Vinaigrette • Three-Bean Salad with Red Onion and Red Bell Pepper • Buffalo Burgers with Pickled Onions and Smoky Red Pepper Sauce • Filets Mignons with Mustard Port Sauce with Red Onion Confit • Red Onion Sauerkraut

A D D I T I O N A L   I N F O

Onions on Wikipedia • Raw Onion Nutrition Info









F U E R T E    A V O C A D O
The Fuerte is a medium sized avocado that has green thin, smooth skin. The flesh is pale green and creamy with nutty flavor.
The Avocado is the pear-shaped fruit of the Avocado tree. The fruit has a bumpy, leathery rind and soft, creamy flesh rich in beneficial fats and nutrients. The seed is large and smooth. The fruits mature on the tree but naturally fall to the ground and ripen off of the tree.
H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S
Avocados are rich in vitamin B6 and potassium, which are helpful for regulating stress and combating PMS and infertility. Their high concentration of mono-unsaturated fats make it helpful in protecting against heart disease. High levels of Vitamin C and E make avocados good for the skin. In addition, this food is easily digested and is a good energy food for vegetarians.
H I S T O R Y
The avocado’s origins trace to Central and South America, where it was farmed 10,000 years ago. It was used as an aphrodisiac and fertility treatment by the Aztecs. Historically, the food’s perception as a sexual stimulant made it a food taboo to purhcase and consume. Even the word avocado comes from the Nahuatl word āhuacatl (testicle). Avocados were introduced to the United States in the 19th century.
S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G
Select Fuerte avocados that are yielding to the touch yet retain a deep green color. If the avocados are too firm, wait a few days for them to ripen. Placing avocados near bananas and apples will accelerate the ripening process. Avoid avocados overly soft to the touch.
Store halved avocados in plastic in the refrigerator, keeping pit intact. Avocado flesh oxidizes quickly with exposure to air.
P R E P   T I P S
Avocados are best eaten fresh and raw. They make a creamy addition to sandwiches and salads. They are also popular in sushi rolls or as the main ingredient in guacamole. Avocados have also been used as a dairy substitute in smoothies and pudding recipes.
R E C I P E S
Avocado and Pesto Pasta Recipe • Avocado Tacos • Video:Avocado Olive Dip • Quick Vegetarian Chili with Avocado Salsa • Vegetable Fajitas with Avocado and Tomato Salsa • Perfect Guacamole • Avocado Dessert • Avocado-Chocolate Pudding • Avocado Breakfast Pudding
A D D I T I O N A L   I N F O
Avocado on Wikipedia • Avocado Nutrition Info

F U E R T E    A V O C A D O

The Fuerte is a medium sized avocado that has green thin, smooth skin. The flesh is pale green and creamy with nutty flavor.

The Avocado is the pear-shaped fruit of the Avocado tree. The fruit has a bumpy, leathery rind and soft, creamy flesh rich in beneficial fats and nutrients. The seed is large and smooth. The fruits mature on the tree but naturally fall to the ground and ripen off of the tree.

H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S

Avocados are rich in vitamin B6 and potassium, which are helpful for regulating stress and combating PMS and infertility. Their high concentration of mono-unsaturated fats make it helpful in protecting against heart disease. High levels of Vitamin C and E make avocados good for the skin. In addition, this food is easily digested and is a good energy food for vegetarians.

H I S T O R Y

The avocado’s origins trace to Central and South America, where it was farmed 10,000 years ago. It was used as an aphrodisiac and fertility treatment by the Aztecs. Historically, the food’s perception as a sexual stimulant made it a food taboo to purhcase and consume. Even the word avocado comes from the Nahuatl word āhuacatl (testicle). Avocados were introduced to the United States in the 19th century.

S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G

Select Fuerte avocados that are yielding to the touch yet retain a deep green color. If the avocados are too firm, wait a few days for them to ripen. Placing avocados near bananas and apples will accelerate the ripening process. Avoid avocados overly soft to the touch.

Store halved avocados in plastic in the refrigerator, keeping pit intact. Avocado flesh oxidizes quickly with exposure to air.

P R E P   T I P S

Avocados are best eaten fresh and raw. They make a creamy addition to sandwiches and salads. They are also popular in sushi rolls or as the main ingredient in guacamole. Avocados have also been used as a dairy substitute in smoothies and pudding recipes.

R E C I P E S

Avocado and Pesto Pasta Recipe • Avocado Tacos • Video:Avocado Olive Dip • Quick Vegetarian Chili with Avocado Salsa • Vegetable Fajitas with Avocado and Tomato Salsa • Perfect Guacamole • Avocado Dessert • Avocado-Chocolate Pudding • Avocado Breakfast Pudding

A D D I T I O N A L   I N F O

Avocado on Wikipedia • Avocado Nutrition Info

C O C K T A I  L    G R A P E F R U I T
The Cocktail grapefruit is a cross between a pomelo and a Mandarin orange. It has seeds, a very sweet flavor and low acidity. It is less bitter than other grapefruit varieties.
The grapefruit is a citrus fruit and a natural cross of the pomelo and the sweet orange. It was known as shaddock (or shattuck) until the 1800s. Its current name alludes to clusters of the fruit on the tree, which often appear similar to grapes. It has a crisp scent and bittersweet flavor.
H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S
Studies have shown grapefruit helps lower cholesterol and there is evidence that the seeds and flesh have high levels of antioxidants which help protect the body against cancer. Grapefruit also has a mild laxative effect. Grapefruit peel oil is used in aromatherapy and it is historically known for its aromatic scent.
H I S T O R Y
Grapefruit was first documented in 1750 by the Rev. Griffith Hughes describing specimens from Barbados. It was brought to Florida in 1823. 
S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G 
Select grapefruits that are firm yet yielding and heavy for their size. They are best stored on a shaded countertop for a week but can also be refrigerated to last up to two months.
P R E P   T I P S
Best eaten fresh and raw, grapefruits are often sliced in half with segments scooped out using a spoon. Honey is a nice complement to grapefruit’s flavor and can be used to mellow out an overly tart fruit.
R E C I P E S
Broiled Grapefruit • Grapefruit and Avocado Salad • Spicy Grapefruit Coleslaw • Vegan Grapefruit Granita Sorbet Recipe • Gourmet Grapefruit Gazpacho Recipe • Grapefruit Sunrise Smoothie  • Poppy Seed Grapefruit Torte • Shrimp and Grapefruit Spinach Salad
A D D I T I O N A L   I N F O
Grapefruit on Wikipedia • White Grapefruit Nutrition Info

C O C K T A I  L    G R A P E F R U I T

The Cocktail grapefruit is a cross between a pomelo and a Mandarin orange. It has seeds, a very sweet flavor and low acidity. It is less bitter than other grapefruit varieties.

The grapefruit is a citrus fruit and a natural cross of the pomelo and the sweet orange. It was known as shaddock (or shattuck) until the 1800s. Its current name alludes to clusters of the fruit on the tree, which often appear similar to grapes. It has a crisp scent and bittersweet flavor.

H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S

Studies have shown grapefruit helps lower cholesterol and there is evidence that the seeds and flesh have high levels of antioxidants which help protect the body against cancer. Grapefruit also has a mild laxative effect. Grapefruit peel oil is used in aromatherapy and it is historically known for its aromatic scent.

H I S T O R Y

Grapefruit was first documented in 1750 by the Rev. Griffith Hughes describing specimens from Barbados. It was brought to Florida in 1823. 

S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G 

Select grapefruits that are firm yet yielding and heavy for their size. They are best stored on a shaded countertop for a week but can also be refrigerated to last up to two months.

P R E P   T I P S

Best eaten fresh and raw, grapefruits are often sliced in half with segments scooped out using a spoon. Honey is a nice complement to grapefruit’s flavor and can be used to mellow out an overly tart fruit.

R E C I P E S

Broiled Grapefruit • Grapefruit and Avocado Salad • Spicy Grapefruit Coleslaw • Vegan Grapefruit Granita Sorbet Recipe • Gourmet Grapefruit Gazpacho Recipe • Grapefruit Sunrise Smoothie  • Poppy Seed Grapefruit Torte • Shrimp and Grapefruit Spinach Salad

A D D I T I O N A L   I N F O

Grapefruit on WikipediaWhite Grapefruit Nutrition Info




V A Q U E R O  D R I E D   B E A N S
The Vaquero is an heirloom variety of dried bean that is a relative of the ancient Anasazi variety. It has black and white spots and cooks to a flavor similar to the Anasazi. While cooking, this bean turns the surrounding liquid into a dark molasses color.
H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S
Beans are an high in protein and soluble fiber (which is easily digested and helps maintain healthy cholesterol levels,) folic acid which helps prevent anemia and protects against birth defects, and diabetic-friendly starches.
H I S T O R Y
Beans were first cultivated in South America, 5000 years ago.
S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G
Select beans that are smooth and free from debris. Dry beans will keep indefinitely if stored in a cool, dry place, but as time passes, their nutrient value and flavor degrade and cooking times lengthen.
P R E P   T I P S
Rinse beans and soak them in cold water overnight. The next morning, rinse and drain 3 times until the water is clear. Cook beans in a mirepoix of celery, onions and carrots and 3x water. Simmer ~60 minutes or until soft and then drain and season with salt and spices.
R E C I P E SCooked Vaquero Beans • Cowboy Beans • Vaquero Bean & Chorizo Stew • Yam & Bean Orange-Scented Chili • Smokin’ Hot Vegan Vaquero Chili • Smokin’ Hot Vegan Vaquero Chili (With Vegan Cornbread) • Refried and Drunken Beans
A D D I T I O N A L   I N F O
Beans on Wikipedia • Dried Bean Nutrition Info • Vaquero Beans from Rancho Gordo

V A Q U E R O  D R I E D   B E A N S

The Vaquero is an heirloom variety of dried bean that is a relative of the ancient Anasazi variety. It has black and white spots and cooks to a flavor similar to the Anasazi. While cooking, this bean turns the surrounding liquid into a dark molasses color.

H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S

Beans are an high in protein and soluble fiber (which is easily digested and helps maintain healthy cholesterol levels,) folic acid which helps prevent anemia and protects against birth defects, and diabetic-friendly starches.

H I S T O R Y

Beans were first cultivated in South America, 5000 years ago.

S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G

Select beans that are smooth and free from debris. Dry beans will keep indefinitely if stored in a cool, dry place, but as time passes, their nutrient value and flavor degrade and cooking times lengthen.

P R E P   T I P S

Rinse beans and soak them in cold water overnight. The next morning, rinse and drain 3 times until the water is clear. Cook beans in a mirepoix of celery, onions and carrots and 3x water. Simmer ~60 minutes or until soft and then drain and season with salt and spices.

R E C I P E S
Cooked Vaquero Beans • Cowboy Beans • Vaquero Bean & Chorizo Stew • Yam & Bean Orange-Scented Chili • Smokin’ Hot Vegan Vaquero Chili • Smokin’ Hot Vegan Vaquero Chili (With Vegan Cornbread) • Refried and Drunken Beans

A D D I T I O N A L   I N F O

Beans on Wikipedia • Dried Bean Nutrition Info • Vaquero Beans from Rancho Gordo








R O M A N E S C O   B R O C C O L I
Romanesco broccoli is actually a variation of cauliflower. It resembles cauliflower but is light green. It is known as a ‘fractal food’ as its florets and stems are clustered in fractal-like spiral shapes. Romanesco broccoli has a soft texture and pleasant nutty-cauliflower flavor. It is also known by the name Broccoflower.
H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S
It is a highly nutritious food, with many studies linking it to preventing digestive tract cancers. It has high levels of carotenoids which help promote glowing skin, and iron, Vitamin C and folate which combat anemia and are beneficial for healthy reproductive systems.
H I S T O R Y
Romanesco broccoli was first documented in the 16th century in Italy. It is a descendant of wild cabbage.
Wild cabbage originated along the northern and western coasts of the Mediterranean, where it was domesticated thousands of years ago and bred into varying forms, including broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kale, kohlrabi, and brussels sprouts, all of which remain the same species today.

S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G
As with selecting broccoli or cauliflower, look for Romanesco heads which are firm and intact and do not have brown spotting. It can be stored in a plastic bag in the refrigerator and will last nearly a week.
P R E P   T I P S
Romanesco broccoli can be prepared in the same manner as broccoli or cauliflower, but should be cooked for shorter amounts of time. It can also be eaten raw and can make a beautiful addition to a vegetable plate.
R E C I P E S
Romanesco with mustard sauce • Romanesco Clafoutis with Soy Ricotta • Spirali Pasta with Romanesco and Peas • Romanesco, Red Rice and A Coriander Pesto Sauce • Garlic Romanesco Broccoli • Braised Romanesco Broccoli with Onions and Olives • Sauteed Broccoli Romanesco • Romanesco Broccoli and Rigatoni • Romanesco Broccoli Rotini • Broccoli Romanesco With Parmesan
A D D I T I O N A L   I N F O
Romanesco Broccoli on Wikipedia • Green Cauliflower Nutrition Info

R O M A N E S C O   B R O C C O L I

Romanesco broccoli is actually a variation of cauliflower. It resembles cauliflower but is light green. It is known as a ‘fractal food’ as its florets and stems are clustered in fractal-like spiral shapes. Romanesco broccoli has a soft texture and pleasant nutty-cauliflower flavor. It is also known by the name Broccoflower.

H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S

It is a highly nutritious food, with many studies linking it to preventing digestive tract cancers. It has high levels of carotenoids which help promote glowing skin, and iron, Vitamin C and folate which combat anemia and are beneficial for healthy reproductive systems.

H I S T O R Y

Romanesco broccoli was first documented in the 16th century in Italy. It is a descendant of wild cabbage.

Wild cabbage originated along the northern and western coasts of the Mediterranean, where it was domesticated thousands of years ago and bred into varying forms, including broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kale, kohlrabi, and brussels sprouts, all of which remain the same species today.

S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G

As with selecting broccoli or cauliflower, look for Romanesco heads which are firm and intact and do not have brown spotting. It can be stored in a plastic bag in the refrigerator and will last nearly a week.

P R E P   T I P S

Romanesco broccoli can be prepared in the same manner as broccoli or cauliflower, but should be cooked for shorter amounts of time. It can also be eaten raw and can make a beautiful addition to a vegetable plate.

R E C I P E S

Romanesco with mustard sauce • Romanesco Clafoutis with Soy Ricotta • Spirali Pasta with Romanesco and Peas • Romanesco, Red Rice and A Coriander Pesto Sauce • Garlic Romanesco Broccoli • Braised Romanesco Broccoli with Onions and Olives • Sauteed Broccoli Romanesco • Romanesco Broccoli and Rigatoni • Romanesco Broccoli Rotini • Broccoli Romanesco With Parmesan

A D D I T I O N A L   I N F O

Romanesco Broccoli on Wikipedia • Green Cauliflower Nutrition Info








P E R S I A N   L I M E
Persian is a lime variety with solid green coloring and slightly protruding ends. It has thin skin and pale green seedless flesh. It is the variety that is typically sold in grocery stores because of its lack of seeds and longer shelf life. This variety is less acidic and bitter than other varieties. It is also known as the Bearss lime and the Tahiti lime.
The lime is a small member of the citrus fruit family, often associated with lemons and used to flavor desserts and beverages. It is valued for its acidity and unique sour flavor.
H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S
Nutritionally, limes have high levels of Vitamin C and bioflavonoids, which make them a useful food for cancer protection and for defending against colds.
H I S T O R Y
Limes originated in Southeast Asia. They were consumed by British sailors in the 18th century to prevent scurvy - sailors drank lime juice mixed with rum daily.
The Persian lime was developed in California by John Bearss in 1895.
S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G
Select Persian limes that are bright solid green and are glossy, firm and fresh looking. Store limes in the refrigerator.
P R E P   T I P S
Use lime juice freshly squeezed in drinks, cocktails, sauces and desserts.
R E C I P E S
Spicy Garlic Lime Chicken • Pan-Seared Tilapia with Chile Lime Butter • Tortilla Soup with Chicken and Lime • Tequila Lime Chicken • Black Bean and Tomato Quinoa • Fresh Lime Margarita • Lemon Lime Dessert  • Lime Angel Food Cake with Lime Glaze and Pistachios • Coconut Cake with Lime Curd • Mother’s Whipped Lime Dessert
A D D I T I O N A L   I N F O
Persian Lime on Wikipedia • Lime Juice Nutrition Info

P E R S I A N   L I M E

Persian is a lime variety with solid green coloring and slightly protruding ends. It has thin skin and pale green seedless flesh. It is the variety that is typically sold in grocery stores because of its lack of seeds and longer shelf life. This variety is less acidic and bitter than other varieties. It is also known as the Bearss lime and the Tahiti lime.

The lime is a small member of the citrus fruit family, often associated with lemons and used to flavor desserts and beverages. It is valued for its acidity and unique sour flavor.

H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S

Nutritionally, limes have high levels of Vitamin C and bioflavonoids, which make them a useful food for cancer protection and for defending against colds.

H I S T O R Y

Limes originated in Southeast Asia. They were consumed by British sailors in the 18th century to prevent scurvy - sailors drank lime juice mixed with rum daily.

The Persian lime was developed in California by John Bearss in 1895.

S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G

Select Persian limes that are bright solid green and are glossy, firm and fresh looking. Store limes in the refrigerator.

P R E P   T I P S

Use lime juice freshly squeezed in drinks, cocktails, sauces and desserts.

R E C I P E S

Spicy Garlic Lime Chicken • Pan-Seared Tilapia with Chile Lime Butter • Tortilla Soup with Chicken and Lime • Tequila Lime Chicken • Black Bean and Tomato Quinoa • Fresh Lime Margarita • Lemon Lime Dessert  • Lime Angel Food Cake with Lime Glaze and Pistachios • Coconut Cake with Lime Curd • Mother’s Whipped Lime Dessert

A D D I T I O N A L   I N F O

Persian Lime on Wikipedia • Lime Juice Nutrition Info








C O M M O N   L A M B S Q U A R T E R S
Lamb’s quarters are a weedy annual plant that grows wild in many free spaces throughout the world. The leaves and shoots of the plant are eaten - usually steamed - or added raw to salads, imparting a flavor similar to chard. It is cultivated as a grain in some parts of the world and is botanically related to quinoa. The plant is also known by the names of Fat-hen, Goosefoot and Pigweed.
H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S
Like other leafy green vegetables, lamb’s quarters have good amounts of fiber to assist digestion, as well as high levels of beta carotene (which the body synthesizes into Vitamin A) which is beneficial to the skin and to immunity, and very high amounts of Vitamin K which is helpful for  maintaining healthy bones. Lamb’s quarters have an unusually high calcium content. 
People who have kidney stones or kidney disease should eat lamb’s quarters sparingly, as they contain oxalic acid which can aggravate these conditions.

H I S T O R Y
Culinary use of lamb’s quarters traces back to Native Americans, who ate the leaves of this plant and ground its flowers and seeds into flour.
S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G
Select leaves that are intact with no wilting, holes or brown spots. Store in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.
P R E P   T I P S
For raw use in salads, sandwiches and smoothies, select the smaller leaves and remove the stems. Larger leaves can be lightly steamed, sautéed, or added to stews.
R E C I P E S
Lamb’sQuarters and Beans • Wilted Lamb’s Quarters • Lemony Lamb’s Quarters Feta Salad • Lamb’s Quarters Lasagna • Lamb’s Quarter Pesto • Lamb’s Quarters Spread • Lamb’s Quarters Cocktail
A D D I T I O N A L   I N F O
Lamb’s Quarters on Wikipedia • Lamb’s Quarters Nutrition Info

C O M M O N   L A M B S Q U A R T E R S

Lamb’s quarters are a weedy annual plant that grows wild in many free spaces throughout the world. The leaves and shoots of the plant are eaten - usually steamed - or added raw to salads, imparting a flavor similar to chard. It is cultivated as a grain in some parts of the world and is botanically related to quinoa. The plant is also known by the names of Fat-hen, Goosefoot and Pigweed.

H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S

Like other leafy green vegetables, lamb’s quarters have good amounts of fiber to assist digestion, as well as high levels of beta carotene (which the body synthesizes into Vitamin A) which is beneficial to the skin and to immunity, and very high amounts of Vitamin K which is helpful for  maintaining healthy bones. Lamb’s quarters have an unusually high calcium content. 

People who have kidney stones or kidney disease should eat lamb’s quarters sparingly, as they contain oxalic acid which can aggravate these conditions.

H I S T O R Y

Culinary use of lamb’s quarters traces back to Native Americans, who ate the leaves of this plant and ground its flowers and seeds into flour.

S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G

Select leaves that are intact with no wilting, holes or brown spots. Store in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.

P R E P   T I P S

For raw use in salads, sandwiches and smoothies, select the smaller leaves and remove the stems. Larger leaves can be lightly steamed, sautéed, or added to stews.

R E C I P E S

Lamb’sQuarters and Beans • Wilted Lamb’s Quarters • Lemony Lamb’s Quarters Feta Salad • Lamb’s Quarters Lasagna • Lamb’s Quarter Pesto • Lamb’s Quarters Spread • Lamb’s Quarters Cocktail

A D D I T I O N A L   I N F O

Lamb’s Quarters on Wikipedia • Lamb’s Quarters Nutrition Info




S H I I T A K E   M U S H R O O M
The Shiitake is an edible mushroom native to East Asia, where it is commonly cultivated and consumed in many Asian cuisines including Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Thai.
Mushrooms are edible fungi and most that are sold in markets are produced on farms. It is recommended that only people trained in mushroom identification gather them in the wild.
H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S
Shiitake mushrooms have been researched for their medicinal benefits, most notably their anti-tumor properties in laboratory mice. Extracts from Shiitake mushrooms have also been researched for their anti-viral properties and as a possible treatment for severe allergies and arthritis. Lenthionine, a key flavor compound of Shiitake, inhibits platelet aggregation, so it is a promising treatment for people who have problems with blood clots.
H I S T O R Y
Shiitake are native to China but have been grown in both Japan and China since prehistoric times. They have been cultivated for over 1000 years; the first written record of Shiitake cultivation can be traced to around 1000AD.
In general, mushrooms have been used by man for both food and medicine for many thousands of years, the first written records coming from China around 3000BC.
S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G
When selecting Shiitake mushrooms in the market, look for firm caps, avoiding ones that are cracked. To store, wrap the mushrooms in a paper towel and store them in the fridge and they will keep for several days.
P R E P   T I P S
Shiitake mushrooms are commonly used in asian dishes, including stir frys and soups. They can be braised, sautéed, grilled or roasted. The stems are useful for making flavorful vegetable stock for soups.
R E C I P E S
Hearty Shiitake Mushroom and Miso Soup • Fettuccine with Shiitake Mushrooms & Basil • Exotic Mushroom and Walnut Pate • The Best Thai Coconut Soup • Shiitake Mushrooms with Young Pecorino Cheese • Fettuccine with Shiitake Mushroom Sauce • Potato and Shiitake Mushroom Gratin • Barley with Shiitake Mushrooms • Shiitake-Crusted Chicken with Creamed Mushrooms • Risotto with Leeks, Shiitake Mushrooms, and Truffles • Lamb and Shiitake Mushroom Stir-Fry
A D D I T I O N A L   I N F O
Shiitake Mushroom on Wikipedia • Mushroom on Wikipedia •  Shiitake Mushroom Nutrition Info 

S H I I T A K E   M U S H R O O M

The Shiitake is an edible mushroom native to East Asia, where it is commonly cultivated and consumed in many Asian cuisines including Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Thai.

Mushrooms are edible fungi and most that are sold in markets are produced on farms. It is recommended that only people trained in mushroom identification gather them in the wild.

H E A L T H   B E N E F I T S

Shiitake mushrooms have been researched for their medicinal benefits, most notably their anti-tumor properties in laboratory mice. Extracts from Shiitake mushrooms have also been researched for their anti-viral properties and as a possible treatment for severe allergies and arthritis. Lenthionine, a key flavor compound of Shiitake, inhibits platelet aggregation, so it is a promising treatment for people who have problems with blood clots.

H I S T O R Y

Shiitake are native to China but have been grown in both Japan and China since prehistoric times. They have been cultivated for over 1000 years; the first written record of Shiitake cultivation can be traced to around 1000AD.

In general, mushrooms have been used by man for both food and medicine for many thousands of years, the first written records coming from China around 3000BC.

S E L E C T I O N  &  S T O R I N G

When selecting Shiitake mushrooms in the market, look for firm caps, avoiding ones that are cracked. To store, wrap the mushrooms in a paper towel and store them in the fridge and they will keep for several days.

P R E P   T I P S

Shiitake mushrooms are commonly used in asian dishes, including stir frys and soups. They can be braised, sautéed, grilled or roasted. The stems are useful for making flavorful vegetable stock for soups.

R E C I P E S

Hearty Shiitake Mushroom and Miso Soup • Fettuccine with Shiitake Mushrooms & Basil • Exotic Mushroom and Walnut Pate • The Best Thai Coconut Soup • Shiitake Mushrooms with Young Pecorino Cheese • Fettuccine with Shiitake Mushroom Sauce • Potato and Shiitake Mushroom Gratin • Barley with Shiitake Mushrooms • Shiitake-Crusted Chicken with Creamed Mushrooms • Risotto with Leeks, Shiitake Mushrooms, and Truffles • Lamb and Shiitake Mushroom Stir-Fry

A D D I T I O N A L   I N F O

Shiitake Mushroom on Wikipedia • Mushroom on Wikipedia •  Shiitake Mushroom Nutrition Info